RAVEbabe

While most insurance policies won’t cover boob jobs, is it really possible that your new jugs could be a tax write-off? For one Indiana woman, they sure were. But before you throw caution to the wind and schedule a breast augmentation STAT, there’s something you should know.

Stage Props

The genius woman who found a tax loophole of sorts goes by the stage name of “Chesty Love.” That’s right, she’s an exotic dancer, and she convinced a judge that her $2,000+ breast enhancement was nothing more than a business investment.

Surprisingly, the judge ruled that her 56N gigunda boobs were the equivalent of a stage prop and that no personal gain was involved for Ms. Love. In fact, Chesty reported earning a whopping $70,000 in a 20 week period, thanks to radio and TV appearances featuring her larger-than-life melons.

Most women aren’t going to be granted the ability to deduct their boob job from their yearly income.

An Unusual Case

Truth be told, this is an unusual case. If you are considering a breast augmentation, most cosmetic surgeons will offer realistic financing solutions to help make your procedure as affordable as possible. This is something that you’ll want to discuss with your cosmetic surgeon during your initial consultation.

Also, be wary of any “too good to be true” deals, as a cheap boob job is not likely to get you the lovely results you want.

A Word of Caution

Take it from Chesty: don’t assume that bigger is always better, especially when it comes to your breast implants. Although her 56Ns were tax deductible money-making machines, most women benefit from more modest, natural-looking implants.